Archive from September, 2019
Sep 30, 2019 - Uncategorized    No Comments

India climbs down the list of visa-free countries since 2010

Since 2010, India has dropped from the 77th rank to the 86th rank of
187 countries. India is the lowest among BRICS nations on the visa-
free access-list we have only eight new additions since 2010.
China and Brazil managed to climb higher up the ranking with 14 and
10 new names added respectively to their visa-free access list. China
now stands on the 74th rank and Brazil has halted higher above, at
the 18th rank.
Russia and South Africa were among the BRICS countries that suffered
a fall. Russia climbed down two ranks, while South Africa slipped
seven.
Nigeria and Syria had the steepest falls with 20 ranks. The United
Arab Emirates topped the global game with a climb of 45 ranks on the
list.
www.sami.co.za

KZN Health withdraws circular on foreign doctors

KwaZulu-Natal Health MEC, Nomagugu Simelane-Zulu says the department has decided to withdraw a circular stating that the hiring of foreign doctors would be put on hold.
The Africa News Agency earlier reported that the internal circular released last week was signed by acting head of Health, Musa Gumede.
Gumede said the decision was taken to prioritise South African doctors trained in Cuba.
Simelane-Zulu says she has decided to do her own investigation into the matter.

“The fifth administration had taken a policy decision to put on hold the employment of any foreign national doctors on the basis that KwaZulu-Natal was faced with unemployed young doctors,” said Simelane-Zulu.
“For the department to absorb or incorporate all the doctors in the system, they had to make a decision to open up all the spaces that were there.”
The MEC says the circular was not discussed or agreed upon by the sixth administration.
“It must be taken by the MEC, but it must importantly the decision must go through the Provincial Executive Council, which it has not. As a result, we have instructed the HOD to withdraw the circular until all relevant stakeholders have been consulted,” she said.
www.samigration.com

Sep 12, 2019 - Uncategorized    No Comments

MEDIA STATEMENT ON SOCIAL MEDIA SCAM ALERT

The Department of Home Affairs has noted messages on social media
saying there are people pretending to be Home Affairs officials only
to rob people once they have gained access to their homes. The
message alleges that they are carrying letterheads purportedly from
the department.

Home Affairs has not received any complaint of this nature from
members of the public. People who are aware of such an activity,
depending on its veracity, are advised to report it to the police.

“We reiterate our message that Home Affairs officials do not and will
not come to your homes to validate IDs”, said acting Home Affairs
Director-General Thulani Mavuso.

Media enquiries:
Siya Qoza â€` 082 898 1657 (spokesperson for the Minister of Home
Affairs)
David Hlabane â€` 071 342 4284 (media manager for the Department of
Home Affairs)

www.samigration.com

‘She does not know him’: How to get a fraudulent marriage annulled

‘She does not know him’: How to get a fraudulent marriage annulled

What to do if Home Affairs fails you?

In 2012 when my cousin went to register to vote , she was told that she was married and her surname was even changed. She then went to Home Affairs and gave them all supporting documents , including an affidavit , to say that the marriage was conducted fraudulently and she does not know him.
She was then told that the marriage was annulled. Earlier this year when she went to register to vote my cousin was again told that she is married. They asked again for all documents, she submitted new documents and the ones she submitted in 2012 . Ever since then, Home Affairs is giving her the run around for the last few months .
She is currently heavily stressed and cannot apply for the new smart ID or renew her driver’s license. All Home Affairs can tell her is that he is a Pakistani.
We would appreciate any advice or help in my cousin getting her life back together.
Thanks,
Concerned Cousin
Dear Reader,
We can completely understand why your cousin is incredibly stressed and frustrated – she probably feels like she is constantly hitting a brick wall of red tape and empty promises. Of course, it’s going to be very difficult for her to carry on with her life without dealing with this fraudulent marriage weighing her down.
Sadly, fraudulent marriages are quite common in South Africa, and many women across the country are sent from pillar to post trying to solve the issue (it’s even been reported that some women have been trying to dispute alleged fake marriage for over a decade!).
In early 2019, it was reported that the Wits Law Clinic would bring class action lawsuits against the Department of Home Affairs on behalf of five women who have been unable to nullify their “marriages”.
Of course, aside from the emotional and financial implications, a fake marriage can have far-reaching consequences, such as not being able to register the births of children or getting birth certificates; racking up bad credit ratings; not being able to marry someone else legally; being denied an ID or drivers licence renewal; and not being able to access any grants- to name a few.
In terms of a possible solution, it’s important to double check that your cousin submitted all the correct documents. Judging by your question, it seems that she did do this multiple times, but just to make sure, use the following as a guide (we’ll offer another solution, too).
According to the Department of Home Affairs spokesperson, David Hlabane, a person who wants to annul a fraudulent marriage must:
• Submit a sworn statement from the South African Police Service that states they have no knowledge of the existence of the marriage.
• Submit ten specimen signatures and a copy of their ID document.
An investigation into the matter should then be carried out. During the investigation, the Department will check for the existence of a marriage register and scrutinise the office in which the alleged marriage was conducted.
In the event that a register does exist, the investigators will compare the signatures on it to the specimens submitted. If there is a discrepancy, the matter will then be referred to a court.
If the above process continues to go nowhere, it is well within a citizen’s right to approach the Public Protector for assistance, and if that proves to be futile, there is the Presidential Hotline.
This is a dedicated hotline for anyone who sought assistance from a government department, province, state organisation or municipality. State departments are bound by the Constitution to carry out their functions and duties transparently and efficiency.
Should they fail to do this, South Africans can hold these departments accountable for not upholding their rights.
Presidential hotline
Tel: 17737 (1 PRES)
Fax: 086 681 0987 /012 323 8246
E-mail: president@po.gov.za
As you can see, this can be a complicated and tricky ordeal to remedy, so if possible, get a lawyer to assist you and have your back, should you have questions.
But it is also worth noting that while the Wits Law Clinic hasn’t indicated when the case of the five women they are representing will go to court, they have stated that other women who are facing this issue must reach out for assistance by emailing Philippa.Kruger@wits.ac.za or calling 011 717 8562.
www.samigration.com

Sep 11, 2019 - Uncategorized    No Comments

Home affairs to roll out face, iris recognition system

Over the years, NEC XON has developed manual and automated border
control solutions leveraging its proprietary biometric
technologies. The company has a long-standing relationship with
the DHA, alongside other technology partners, developing its
biometric technologies under the “Bio-IDiom” brand offerings.
The home affairs ministry, whose core function is to manage
identity, civil status and migration of citizens, has over the
years made clear its intention to introduce digital services to
better serve citizens.
The introduction of the multimodal biometrics system, according to
Le Roux, is part of the department’s automated biometric
identification system (ABIS) launched last year after being
piloted for a few years.
Itreplaced the Home Affairs National Identity System (HANIS), and
is being rolled-out in phases, over a five-year period, with the
next phase including the implementation of the multimodal
biometrics.
“Home affairs has been a long-time customer of ours, since we
deployed the HANIS system, which was mainly based on the finger
identification system,” notes Le Roux.
“Since renewing our contractual agreement, we have implemented a
technology upgrade, introducing the ABIS solutions, which use
multiple sources of authentication, including face, iris, palm
print, finger vein, infant footprints and voice, which helps with
accuracy and service delivery improvements, due to faster
turnaround times, reduced cases of duplicate identities and higher
security.”
NEC XON started the research of biometric authentication
technologies in the 1970s and has serviced an array of private and
government organisations across the globe.
The ABIS system will integrate with other relevant systems,
serving as a single source for biometric authentication of
citizens and non-citizens across state institutions and private
sector entities.
According to the DHA, the banks will be able to verify a client’s
identity quicker, the tourism department will benefit due to
quicker response times at ports of entry to capture or verify a
traveller’s identity, and the South African Police Service will be
able to search for suspects by matching latent prints against
records on ABIS.
“This system will make immigration a lot easier, enabling seamless
passport travel, where in future, customers will only use their
face for identification purposes and won’t be required to go
through passport control, a system which is already being
implemented in countries across the globe. This could mean that if
one loses their passport or plane ticket, they can still fly in a
plane.”
The multimodal system is scalable and expandable for future
capabilities, and is protected through cutting-edge authentication
and security protocols, says Le Roux.
This development builds on the approach used to develop the smart
ID card, which has now been issued to over 10 million citizens
www.samigration.com

Mangosuthu Buthelezi’s message against xenophobia

IFP president emeritus and traditional prime minister to the Zulu nation, Mangosuthu Buthelezi, met with the community to quell tensions in light of recent xenophobic attacks on foreign nationals on September 8 2019. Below is his full speech.
Johannesburg, September 8 2019
I come here today not as a politician, but as an elder. There is a terrible quarrel in our nation with foreign nationals who are living amongst us. Lives have been lost and property damaged. There has been looting and burning and violence. While all this is happening, the world is watching, and we are being judged.
I must speak very bluntly to my fellow South Africans, not to take sides, but to quell the tensions with the voice of truth.
What we have seen in the past few days is unacceptable. The attacks on foreign nationals and their businesses are purely xenophobic. It is a violation of human rights and a violation of our Constitution. Our Constitution enshrines the right to freedom from all forms of violence. That right applies to everyone in South Africa, whether citizens or not.
We cannot allow this to move in cycles. It is not the first spate of attacks; but it must be the last
Mangosuthu Buthelezi
I understand the tensions, the complaints and the anger. I understand that there is validity to the complaints, on both sides. I also understand that wrongs have been committed by both sides. This has not come out of nowhere.
But there is a saying in Zulu that you cannot slaughter all the sheep because one sheep has transgressed. In a situation of conflict, it is dangerous to tar everyone with the same brush. Even where there are valid complaints against an individual, we cannot take the law into our own hands. Looting and destruction of property is a crime, full stop. Assault is always wrong.
Don’t think these things have no consequences. This violence has diplomatic and economic ramifications. We have hundreds of thousands of South Africans living in countries throughout Africa. We have businesses and companies operating across this continent. We have vital trade relations within the African Union and within SADC, the Southern African Development Community. South Africa is not an island.
There will be sanctions against us for what we are doing. It started with the Zambian Football Association cancelling a soccer match against Bafana Bafana. Then Nigeria announced a boycott of the World Economic Forum on Africa being held in Cape Town. But as I feared they would, sanctions quickly turned to retaliation.
Already South African-owned companies in Nigeria have been targeted for looting and vandalism. MTN has had to close all its stores to protect staff, while the police stand guard at Shoprite stores. On Thursday our diplomatic missions in Abuja and Lagos were forced to close after threats were received. President Buhari has announced a visit to South Africa to speak to President Ramaphosa
We need to stop this thing in its tracks before serious action is taken against us. Do we really want to escalate into international conflict?
feel ashamed. As Africans we are making ourselves a laughing stock in the rest of the world. Because the world knows what we seem so quick to forget: Africans are brothers and sisters.
In every family there are quarrels and squabbles. But the way we are behaving is shooting ourselves in the foot. We are making the name of South Africa a swear word on the continent.
This is not the first time we have had a spike of xenophobic attacks is our country. In 2008 and in 2015 lives were lost and livelihoods destroyed as communities went on the rampage against foreign nationals. I went then, too, to the communities and townships, and I spoke as I am speaking now.
But now my words are somehow different. The sentiments have not changed, but there is a sense of urgency because I fear what will happen if we fail to extinguish this fire.
The IFP has formally asked the Speaker of the National Assembly to call an urgent debate in parliament, not just to condemn xenophobia, but to hear what the state intends to do to swiftly end the violence.
We cannot allow this to move in cycles. It is not the first spate of attacks; but it must be the last.
We have been facing the rising problem of undocumented migration ever since 1994. I served as the first Minister of Home Affairs in a democratic era. For ten years my department grappled with this, trying to find a way to balance human rights with the good of the country.
I was struck even then by the number of undocumented Africans within our borders, especially from Zimbabwe, and the implications this had for our ability to create social and economic justice for South Africans. But when I pointed out our porous borders and said they need to be guarded, some people actually accused me of xenophobia, saying it was because I didn’t go into exile.
If anyone knows what our African brothers sacrificed for the sake of our struggle, it is I
IFP’s Buthelezi
Many of the countries whose citizens were coming to South Africa had given sanctuary to our political exiles during the struggle for freedom. Being an Anglican myself, I received a letter from the Anglican Bishop of Mozambique, Bishop Dinis Sengulane, lamenting that I was not helping his people who were flocking to South Africa.
These accusations were painful, and quite misplaced. Because if anyone knows what our African brothers sacrificed for the sake of our struggle, it is I. I went myself to Zambia and Tanzania in 1974, to thank President Kaunda and President Nyerere for giving sanctuary to all our exiles. Earlier this year, I again visited His Excellency Dr Kenneth Kaunda in Zambia, and he spoke touchingly about the risks they took on our behalf. Let me quote him directly. He said:
“Prince Buthelezi, we first met in 1974 here in Lusaka when I was a leader of a young independent nation of Zambia and was honoured to be leader of the frontline states which were all newly independent states. We hosted South African political exiles and freedom fighters. (It) was a huge risk to our own freedom as a nation. Financially we could not afford this task, since Ian Smith had closed the borders for us to transport goods through Rhodesia. The security risk was enormous on our people as the apartheid regime in South Africa was becoming more and more vicious. But we had to do that historic duty for the freedom of black people. I am a very proud man that we did this and all God’s children in South Africa… are free today.”
Friends, this is our own history. African countries like Lesotho, Swaziland, Nigeria, Zambia and Tanzania took huge risks on our behalf. Is this how we repay them?
I am not saying that anyone should be able to live in South Africa if they come here illegally, or if they are illegally running a business. If they are committing crime, they are criminals like any South African would be a criminal for doing the same thing. But we cannot adopt the attitude that Africans have no right to come here, and no right to be here, if they come through legitimate channels.
I know that even this is controversial. I remember visiting Geneva for a meeting called by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. As South Africa’s Minister of Home Affairs, I discovered that many people who claim to be refugees are not refugees in the legal sense of the word. Yet due to various and very real problems in their countries, they are forced to try their luck in South Africa.
Through immigration legislation, I sought to protect South Africa, closing the door to undocumented migration while opening it to the skills our country so desperately needs. There is, for instance a shortage of doctors in South Africa, and with our failing health care system we need to welcome professional doctors from Nigeria and other countries.
I still regret the irrational hostility towards my Immigration Act when I brought it to the Cabinet of President Mbeki. We moved in the wrong direction as a country and we never resolved the rising tensions. It’s time to do that now, before it is too late.
We dare not forget or disregard all that was done for us by African leaders like His Excellency President Olusegun Obasanjo. As a member of the Commonwealth Eminent Persons Group, General Obasanjo revealed to the world the real conditions of our people under apartheid. He supported us in our stand against the regime’s plan to deprive us of our citizenship.
In fact, on the very day that Transkei took so-called independence, President Obasanjo arranged for me and my wife to be in Nigeria so that I could avoid attending Transkei’s independence ceremony. General Obasanjo invited me to Nigeria again this year, where I delivered a lecture in celebration of his 82nd birthday.
This is one of the giants of Africa. What are we doing to his people?
I have been a guest of President Hastings Banda in Malawi. I was received by His Imperial Majesty Emperor Haile Selassie in Ethiopia. In Addis Ababa I was received by the Under-Secretary of the OAU, Dr Peter Onu. In Liberia, President Tolbert bestowed upon me a National Order, The Knight Commander of the Star of Africa. And when the OAU bestowed a posthumous award on my mentor Inkosi Albert Luthuli, I accompanied MaNokhukanya Luthuli to Maseru to receive the award from His Majesty King Moshoeshoe II.
If we turn our despair, our anger and frustration against our brothers, we will start a feud that can only end in tragedy
Mangosuthu Buthelezi
Our struggle is tied to the struggle of these countries throughout Africa. They fought colonialism just as we did. And they sacrificed to see us liberated. So when I say that we are one family, I am speaking the truth. Just recently, when my wife passed away, His Majesty the King of Lesotho paid a visit to my home to comfort me.
We are brothers in Africa.
Yes, South Africa is struggling economic hardship. Our country is in crisis. The cry of our people has not fallen on deaf ears. But if we turn our despair, our anger and frustration against our brothers, we will start a feud that can only end in tragedy. We are fighting our own family.
Friends, I am a Christian. I believe what the Bible says. It says, quite clearly:
“When a foreigner resides among you in your land, do not mistreat them. The foreigner residing among you must be treated as your native-born. Love them as yourself, for you were foreigners in Egypt…” (Leviticus 19 v 33 and 34)
“Let them live among you wherever they like and in whatever town they choose. Do not oppress them.” (Deuteronomy 23 v 16)
“Do not take advantage of a hired worker who is poor and needy, whether that worker is a fellow (citizen) or a foreigner residing in one of your towns… Do not deprive the foreigner or the fatherless of justice.” (Deuteronomy 24 v 14 – 17)
“Cursed is anyone who withholds justice from the foreigner.” (Deuteronomy 27 v 19)
“Do not oppress… the foreigner… Do not plot evil against each other.” (Zechariah 7 v 10)
I cannot put it more clearly. This is not my instruction, but God’s. Let us be led by our moral conscience.

Sep 10, 2019 - Uncategorized    No Comments

She does not know him`: How to get a fraudulent marriage annulled

She is currently heavily stressed and cannot apply for the new
smart ID or renew her driver’s license. All Home Affairs can tell
her is that he is a Pakistani.
We would appreciate any advice or help in my cousin getting her
life back together.
Thanks,
Concerned Cousin
Dear Reader,
We can completely understand why your cousin is incredibly
stressed and frustrated – she probably feels like she is
constantly hitting a brick wall of red tape and empty promises. Of
course, it’s going to be very difficult for her to carry on with
her life without dealing with this fraudulent marriage weighing
her down.
Sadly, fraudulent marriages are quite common in South Africa, and
many women across the country are sent from pillar to post trying
to solve the issue (it’s even been reported that some women have
been trying to dispute alleged fake marriage for over a decade!).
In early 2019, it was reported that the Wits Law Clinic would
bring class action lawsuits against the Department of Home Affairs
on behalf of five women who have been unable to nullify their
“marriages”.
Of course, aside from the emotional and financial implications, a
fake marriage can have far-reaching consequences, such as not
being able to register the births of children or getting birth
certificates; racking up bad credit ratings; not being able to
marry someone else legally; being denied an ID or drivers licence
renewal; and not being able to access any grants- to name a few.
In terms of a possible solution, it’s important to double check
that your cousin submitted all the correct documents. Judging by
your question, it seems that she did do this multiple times, but
just to make sure, use the following as a guide (we’ll offer
another solution, too).
According to the Department of Home Affairs spokesperson, David
Hlabane, a person who wants to annul a fraudulent marriage must:
• Submit a sworn statement from the South African Police Service
that states they have no knowledge of the existence of the
marriage.
• Submit ten specimen signatures and a copy of their ID document.
An investigation into the matter should then be carried out.
During the investigation, the Department will check for the
existence of a marriage register and scrutinise the office in
which the alleged marriage was conducted.
In the event that a register does exist, the investigators will
compare the signatures on it to the specimens submitted. If there
is a discrepancy, the matter will then be referred to a court.
If the above process continues to go nowhere, it is well within a
citizen’s right to approach the Public Protector for assistance,
and if that proves to be futile, there is the Presidential
Hotline.
This is a dedicated hotline for anyone who sought assistance from
a government department, province, state organisation or
municipality. State departments are bound by the Constitution to
carry out their functions and duties transparently and efficiency.
Should they fail to do this, South Africans can hold these
departments accountable for not upholding their rights.
Presidential hotline
Tel: 17737 (1 PRES)
Fax: 086 681 0987 /012 323 8246
E-mail: president@po.gov.za
As you can see, this can be a complicated and tricky ordeal to
remedy, so if possible, get a lawyer to assist you and have your
back, should you have questions.
But it is also worth noting that while the Wits Law Clinic hasn’t
indicated when the case of the five women they are representing
will go to court, they have stated that other women who are facing
this issue must reach out for assistance by emailing
Philippa.Kruger@wits.ac.za or calling 011 717 8562.
www.samigration.com

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