Archive from November, 2020

Mkhize clears up South Africa’s current travel and quarantine rules

Health minister Dr Zweli Mkhize has provided answers on some of the government’s key level 1 lockdown regulations.
Responding in a written parliamentary Q&A to the Democratic Alliance, Mkhize detailed the rules in place for travellers who are arriving from other countries and those South African who cannot self-quarantine at home.
His answers are outlined in more detail below.
What happens to persons who cannot self-quarantine because of insufficient space in their own homes, but equally cannot afford to pay for government quarantine in a 4-star hotel?
South Africans that are unable to self-quarantine at home are directed to a state-run facility where they will be able to quarantine. There is no charge for the use of this facility.
Do students from other countries have to undergo weekly Covid-19 tests in line with (the level 1) regulations?
Daily commuters from neighbouring countries who attend or teach at a school in the Republic, as well as children below the age of five years, are exempted from the provisions of subparagraph (3)(b) but must comply with the re-entry requirements set out by the Department of Home Affairs.
With reference to persons visiting accepted overseas destinations on holiday but cannot access Covid-19 testing overseas, how are the specified persons accommodated upon their return?
Such persons would need to quarantine at a designated facility for 10 days or alternatively do a Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test immediately upon entry into the country, once the results are available such person is able to apply for early release from quarantine, the period for this is process can be between 24 to 72 hours.
Under South Africa’s level 1 lockdown rules, travellers will be screened for any Covid-19 symptoms and will also be screened for contact with people who have been in contact with others who could have had Covid-19.
Travellers will also need to provide proof of accommodation addresses in case they need to self-isolate. International travel around the world has been severely impacted by the coronavirus pandemic. Those who are found to have Covid-19 after entering the country will be required to isolate for 10 days at their own cost.
Do people visiting accepted overseas destinations on holiday have to apply for self-quarantine before their return?
No, persons visiting accepted overseas destinations do not need to apply for self-quarantine before their return as requirements and procedures for level one have changed aligning with easing of lockdown restrictions. Persons returning into the country are required to produce negative PCR tests which are not older than 72 hours from date of travel.
The Department of Home Affairs published its updated list of high-risk countries on 19 October.
Leisure travellers from high-risk countries will not be permitted. The exception will be business travellers with scarce and critical skills including diplomats, repatriated persons, investors and people participating in professional sporting and, events will undergo the same health protocol screenings.
The previous list of high-risk destination had 60 countries. The latest update carries only 22.
The new list as follows:
• Argentina
• Bangladesh
• Belgium
• Brazil
• Canada
• Chile
• Colombia
• France
• Germany
• India
• Indonesia
• Iran
• Iraq
• Italy
• Mexico
• Netherlands
• Peru
• Philippines
• Russia
• Spain
• United Kingdom
• USA
www.samigration.com

SA’s visa relief for foreigners with special skills

Foreign nationals in South Africa with special skills, especially those on intra-company transfer visas have been given a green light to apply for an extension of their visas by another two years.
This is contained in the Immigration Directive no. 15 of 2020 issued by South Africa’s Home Affairs Minister, Dr Aaron Motsoaledi on Thursday.
He said the move was meant to contribute to an environment in which economic growth is promoted through the employment of needed foreign labour, foreign investment is facilitated and that the entry of exceptionally skilled or qualified people is enabled.
Dr Motsoaledi said he had made the directive in line with the neighboring country’s immigration Act.
This waiver, he said was applicable to holders of ICT visas that expired during the lockdown, including the current period and to those which will expire by 30 June 2021.
“With the powers bestowed upon me in terms of section 31(2)(c) of the Immigration Act, 2002 (Act No 13 of 2002) decided to allow holders of legally issued Intra-Company Transfer(ICT) visas who are currently residing in the Republic of South Africa to apply for another term of 24 months for the ICT visa that they currently hold,” said the Minister.
He said those applying for the extension must prove that the local entity, branch, or affiliate of the company abroad still required the services of the ICT visa holder.
The Minister said they will also need proof in the form of verifiable documents that the skill transfer to a South African or Permanent Residence was completed during the four years of the visas as per the
initial undertaking.
“The ICT visa application will be considered as a new application with no accumulation nor continuation of the validity period of the current visa; In addition, the ICT visa shall not lead towards permanent residence;
and that the (visa) holder will remain in the employment of the designated employer for whom the initial and current ICT visa was issued. No change of employer, status or condition from current visa,”
said Minister Motsoeledi.
He added that the temporary visa concession would only be applicable to holders of legally issued intra-company visas and who are currently resident in the Republic during the lockdown.
Any further extension or modification or amendments to the terms of this concession, the Minister said will only be valid if communicated in writing.
“This Immigration Directive follows Immigration Directive No.14 of 2020 which deals with “Re-instatement of visa exemption for international travellers”,” he said.
South Africa is home to many migrant workers among them Zimbabweans most of whom are their courtesy of the Zimbabwe Exemption Permit (ZEP).
The permits are valid between 1 January 2018 and 31 December 2021and replaced the Zimbabwe Special Permit (ZSP) whose lifespan expired in December 2017.
A total of 197 941 holders of the ZSP permit were eligible to apply for the ZEP when the program started but only 169 000 manage to apply via the Visa Facilitation Services.
www.samigration.com

Court orders Home Affairs to amend records to state that woman was in fact not married

Pretoria – After 16 years of being “married” to a man she has never met, and then struggling to rectify the situation, the Gauteng High Court, Pretoria, has ordered Home Affairs to amend its records to state that the woman was in fact not married.
Judge Jody Kollapen issued the urgent order after another judge earlier ordered that a copy of the application had to be attached to the notice board of the court and it had to be published in a national newspaper.
This was to afford the man stated on the “marital certificate” the opportunity to object or give his side of the story to the court before a final order was issued declaring that no such marriage ever existed.
The so-called husband’s name was stated as Chao Chen on the marriage certificate. The applicant, whose name was withheld on request of the Wits Law Clinic, which was assisting her, said she had no idea who was.
Efforts to locate him were also futile. The woman has struggled for four years, since by chance discovered that she was married, with Home Affairs to rectify the situation. She eventually turned to court in desperation, but the law had to take its course and she could not immediately obtain an order nullifying the situation.
She, however, said she was desperate to have the record set straight and to resume her “unmarried” status yet again, as her “marriage” had hampered several aspects of her life.
She is HIV-positive, suffers from tuberculosis and is bipolar, and is extremely ill. In fact, she stated in court papers she had no idea how long she had to live, especially in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic.
She said she only discovered her marital status after she had lost her ID and tried to apply for another.
To make matters worse, she was married in community of property to the faceless Chen.
And she couldn’t obtain state benefits without her ID. While Home Affairs was willing to issue her with a replacement document, this showed that she was married.
She is unemployed, a recovering drug addict and she is living with a family member who is financially supporting her.
“As a result of my circumstances, I have been unable to apply for a medical grant to assist me in obtaining the necessary medical care I need. I am also unable to enter any rehabilitation centre as a valid ID is needed.”
The woman said he had approached social workers to help her in applying for a medical grant, but without an ID document, their hands were tied too.
“Without a valid ID I am rendered helpless, as I cannot apply for any employment and I have to rely on my family for my medical and everyday needs. The whole ordeal has left me without any dignity, feeling worthless and ashamed. I am also frustrated with Home Affairs, which said they cannot rectify the situation.”
While it was clear that her “husband” did not choose to marry her because of her financial status, it was speculated that he needed to prove that he was married to remain in the country.
The woman said she did not want to die and leave her family with this mess. She also did not want a situation where Chen could live happily for the rest of his life in the country being “married to a South African citizen” if she were to die or did not rectify the situation.
www.samigration.com

EOH faces R44m fine for delays in home affairs tender

The Department of Home Affairs (DHA) has moved to salvage the controversial multimillion-rand Automated Biometric Identification System (ABIS) tender and slapped technology services company EOH with a R44 million penalty over delays in the implementation of the project.
After months of wrangling and negotiations over the delays, the DHA has fined EOH over the R400 million contract and has recommended it be ceded to a suitable subcontractor.
The department has since approached National Treasury seeking guidance on the matter.
EOH is contesting this penalty and the amount is under dispute.
This is not the first time EOH has been hit with a fine in recent months. In July, the company was penalised R7.5 million by the Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE) for publishing false information in its 2017 and 2018 financial results.
The latest details of the fallout between EOH and the department were revealed in Parliament last week by home affairs minister Dr Aaron Motsoaledi, who presented a rescue plan for the ABIS to the portfolio committee on home affairs.
The contract was for EOH to migrate data on the current Home Affairs National Identification System, which only records photos and fingerprints of South African citizens, to the new ABIS.
The final implementation of the system would provide a single source of identification for citizens across state institutions and private sector entities.
The contract was processed and awarded by the State Information Technology Agency on behalf of the DHA.
However, the project was delayed after the missing of master files in the ABIS contract with EOH and a forensic audit is under way into the contract.
Delivery discrepancies
In his presentation to the portfolio committee, Motsoaledi revealed that out of the R400 million contract, R224 million had already been spent on services, infrastructure and software.
He also said in terms of the contract, if there are any delays in the implementation of the project, the DHA reserved the right to levy a penalty for every month of delay.
“In invoking this penalty clause, DHA levied a penalty of R43 973 141.80 against EOH because the project has already been delayed by two years. EOH is contesting this penalty and hence the amount is under dispute. The contract also stipulates that such disputes are to be mediated by a senior counsel appointed jointly by the DHA and EOH Mthombo,” he said.
The joint appointment has already been made and the mediation process is starting this week.
Furthermore, the minister said EOH has taken a decision to exit all government contracts and as part of its exit plan from the DHA contract, EOH is proposing to cede the work to a subcontractor.
“In the event of EOH exiting, the contract still needs to be salvaged because most plans of modernisation of DHA services revolves around ABIS,” Motsoaledi said.
The minister added that the legal opinion obtained by the DHA suggested that ceding is permissible, subject to certain requirements being met.
According to Motsoaledi, after meeting with officials from the Department of Communications and Digital Technologies, it was decided that the DHA proceed with the ceding, provided the cession is approved by National Treasury.
“The DHA has already approached National Treasury for guidance. It is recommended that the portfolio committee notes the decision to cede the ABIS contract to a suitable subcontractor, subject to the finalisation of the negotiations and approval by National Treasury.”
Discord continues
EOH, however, has denied it is quitting government contracts.
A spokesperson says the company has noted the minister’s presentation, adding: “EOH remains committed to the project insofar as the engagements under way present viable options which are commercially sustainable for both parties.
“EOH maintains and intends to maintain its ongoing strategic relationships and engagements with the government insofar as those relationships and engagements are commercially sustainable.”
Further, in terms of the contract, EOH said it is disputing that it is the cause of the delays.
“In this regard, EOH and the DHA are proactively and constructively engaging one another through their respective attorneys with a view to securing an amicable outcome to the difficulties encountered on the Automated Biometric Identification System project to date. There are presently no arrangements or agreements in place concerning the replacement of EOH on that project, whether by cession or otherwise.”
The JSE-listed company has been battling with a myriad challenges − operational and legal.
EOH’s problems surfaced after Microsoft in February last year terminated its contract with the IT services company after an anonymous whistle-blower filed a complaint with the US Securities and Exchange Commission about alleged malfeasance to do with a R120 million contract with the SA Department of Defence.
Ever since, the company has been trying to improve its image after corporate governance issues emerged following an investigation by ENSafrica, which unearthed suspicious transactions worth about R1.2 billion

Protect your privacy from hackers, spies, and the government Simple steps can make the difference between losing your online accounts or maintaining what is now a precious commodity: Your privacy.

“I have nothing to hide” was once the standard response to surveillance programs utilizing cameras, border checks, and casual questioning by law enforcement.
Privacy used to be considered a concept generally respected in many countries — at least, in the West — with a few changes to rules and regulations here and there often made only in the name of the common good.
Things have changed, and not for the better.
China’s Great Firewall, the UK’s Snooper’s Charter, the US’ mass surveillance and bulk data collection — compliments of the National Security Agency (NSA) and Edward Snowden’s whistleblowing — Russia’s insidious election meddling, and countless censorship and communication blackout schemes across the Middle East are all contributing to a global surveillance state in which privacy is a luxury of the few and not a right of the many.
As surveillance becomes a common factor of our daily lives, privacy is in danger of no longer being considered an intrinsic right.
Everything from our web browsing to mobile devices and the Internet of Things (IoT) products installed in our homes have the potential to erode our privacy and personal security, and you cannot depend on vendors or ever-changing surveillance rules to keep them intact.
Having “nothing to hide” doesn’t cut it anymore. We must all do whatever we can to safeguard our personal privacy. Taking the steps outlined below can not only give you some sanctuary from spreading surveillance tactics but also help keep you safe from cyberattackers.
Data management is at the heart of privacy
Data is a vague concept and can encompass such a wide range of information that it is worth briefly breaking down different collections before examining how each area is relevant to your privacy and security.
Personally Identifiable Information
A roundup of the best software and apps for Windows and Mac computers, as well as iOS and Android devices, to keep yourself safe from malware and viruses.
Known as PII, this can include your name, physical home address, email address, telephone numbers, date of birth, marital status, Social Security numbers (US)/National Insurance numbers (UK), and other information relating to your medical status, family members, employment, and education.
Why does it matter? All this data, whether lost in different data breaches or stolen piecemeal through phishing campaigns, can provide attackers with enough information to conduct identity theft, take out loans using your name, and potentially compromise online accounts that rely on security questions being answered correctly. In the wrong hands, this information can also prove to be a gold mine for advertisers lacking a moral backbone.
Browsing habits and website visits
Internet activity is monitored by an Internet Service Provider (ISP) and can be hijacked. While there is little consumers can do about attacks at the ISP level, the web pages you visit can also be tracked by cookies, which are small bits of text that are downloaded and stored by your browser. Browser plugins may also track your activity across multiple websites.
Why does it matter? Cookies are used to personalize internet experiences and this can include tailored advertising. However, such tracking can go too far, as shown when the unique identifiers added to a cookie are then used across different services and on various marketing platforms. Such practices are often considered intrusive.
Today’s security threats have expanded in scope and seriousness. There can now be millions — or even billions — of dollars at risk when information security isn’t handled properly.
Message and email content
Our email accounts are often the pathway that can provide a link to all our other valuable accounts, as well as a record of our communication with friends, families, and colleagues.
Why does it matter? If an email account acts as a singular hub for other services, a single compromise can snowball into the hijack of many accounts and services.
Online purchases, financial information
When you conduct a transaction online, this information may include credentials for financial services such as PayPal, or credit card information including card numbers, expiry dates, and security codes.
Why does it matter? Cybercriminals who steal financial services credentials through phishing and fraudulent websites, who eavesdrop on your transactions through Man-in-The-Middle (MiTM) attacks, or who utilize card-skimming malware, can steal these details when they are not secured.
Once this information has been obtained, unauthorized transactions can be made, clone cards may be created, or this data may also be sold on to others in the Dark Web.
Medical records and DNA profiles
Another entrant to the mix, hospitals are now transitioning to electronic records and home DNA services store genetic information belonging to their users, submitted in the quest for health-related queries or tracing family histories.
Why does it matter? The loss of medical information, which is deeply personal, can be upsetting and result in disastrous consequences for everyone involved.
When it comes to DNA, however, the choice is ours whether to release this information — outside of law enforcement demands — and it is often the use of ancestry services that release this data in the first place. Privacy concerns relating to DNA searches have been cited for sales downturns with some popular home ancestry kits

Cybersecurity: data protection and privacy from hackers, spies, and the government Simple steps can make the difference between losing your online accounts or maintaining what is now a precious commodity

What is being done to protect this information?
What is GDPR?
General Data Protection Regulation, or GDPR, is coming. Here’s what it means, how it’ll impact individuals and businesses.
Businesses that handle data belonging to their customers are being scrutinized more and more with the arrival of regulatory changes such as the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation, designed to create a level playing field and stipulate adequate security measures to protect consumer privacy and data.
Companies will often encrypt your information as part of the process, which is a way to encode information to make it unreadable by unauthorized parties.
One way this is achieved is by using SSL and TLS certificates that support encryption on website domains. While usually a paid service, Let’s Encrypt also offers free SSL/TLS certificates to webmasters who wish to improve their websites’ security. (Unfortunately, this has also led to the adoption of SSL by fraudsters.)
Apple, Google, and Mozilla have gone against a CA/B Forum ballot and have decided to reduce the lifespan of TLS certificates to 398 days, starting September 1.
End-to-end encryption is also becoming more popular. This form of encryption prevents anyone except those communicating from accessing or reading the content of messages, including vendors themselves.
Following Snowden’s disclosure of the NSA’s mass surveillance activities, end-to-end encryption has been widely adopted by many online communication services. With a recent shift to working from home practices prompted by COVID-19, this has expanded to include video conferencing tools.
Privacy advocates may cheer, but governments and law enforcement agencies have not rejoiced at the trend — and a political battlefield has emerged between tech vendors and governments that are attempting to enforce the inclusion of deliberate backdoors into encrypted systems.
It is up to us to make use of any privacy-enabling technology we have at hand. Below are some guides with simple steps to get you started.
Browser basics and Tor
Searching the web is a daily activity for many of us, and as such, it is also a hotbed for tracking and potential cyberattacks.
The most commonly-used browsers are Google Chrome, Apple Safari, Microsoft Edge, Opera, and Mozilla Firefox. However, you should consider using Tor if you want to truly keep your browsing private.
The Tor Project is an open-source browser that is privacy-focused. The software creates tunnels rather than establishing direct connections to websites, which prevents users from being tracked through traffic analysis or IP addresses.

Not to be confused with the Dark Web — although required to access it and .onion domains in general — Tor is legal and is often used by the privacy-conscious, including journalists, activists, civil rights groups, and NGOs.
The Tor browser can be slightly slower than traditional browsers, but it is still the best choice for secure browsing. The non-profit recently launched a membership program to secure funding and boost integration in third-party products.
Desktop and mobile versions of the Tor browser are also available: desktop, the iOS Onion Browser, and Orbot: Tor for Android.
Secure other browsers
If you are more comfortable using Chrome, Safari, Firefox, Microsoft Edge, or another browser, there are still ways to improve your security without implementing major changes to your surfing habits.
Cookies: Clearing out your cookie caches and browser histories can prevent ad networks from collecting too much information about you. The easiest way to do so is to clear the cache
You can also set your preferences to prevent websites from storing cookies at all. In order to do so, check out these guides for Firefox, Chrome, Opera, Safari, and Edge.
HTTP v. HTTPS: When you visit a website address, you will be met with either Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) or Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure (HTTPS). The latter option uses a layer of encryption to enable secure communication between a browser and a server.
The most important thing to remember is while HTTPS is best used by default in general browsing, when it comes to online purchases it is crucial to protecting your payment details from eavesdropping and theft.
It is still possible for payment details to be stolen on the vendor’s side, but to reduce the risk of theft as much as possible you should not hand over any important information to websites without HTTPS enabled. (It is estimated that shopping cart conversion rates increase by 13 percent with HTTPS enabled, which should encourage webmasters to use the protocol, too.)
To find out whether HTTPS is enabled, look in the address bar for “https://.” Many browsers also show a closed padlock.
Search engines
Google’s search engine, alongside other major options such as Yahoo! and Bing, make use of algorithms based on your data to provide “personalized” experiences. However, browsing histories and search queries can be used to create user profiles detailing our histories, clicks, interests, and more, and may become invasive over time.
To prevent such data from being logged, consider using an alternative that does not record your search history and blocks advertising trackers. These options include DuckDuckGo, Qwant, and Startpage.
If you wish to stay with your current browser you can also use software that bolts-on to your browser to enhance the privacy and security of your surfing activities.
Browser plugins
HTTPS Everywhere: Available for Firefox, Chrome, and Opera, HTTPS Everywhere is a plugin created by the Tor Project and Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) to expand HTTPS encryption to many websites, improving the security of your communication with them.
NoScript Security Suite: Endorsed by Edward Snowden as a means to combat government surveillance, this plugin has been built for Firefox and other Mozilla-based browsers for the purposes of disabling active content including JavaScript, which may be used to track your online activity. Users can also choose which domains to trust and whitelist.
Disconnect: Another worthy addition to the list, Disconnect provides a visual guide to websites that are tracking your activity. Invisible trackers that monitor you and may also expose you to malicious content can be blocked. Disconnect is available for Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Opera.
Facebook Container: In a time where Facebook has come under fire for its data collection and sharing practices time after time, Mozilla’s Facebook Container application is a worthwhile plugin to download if you are worried about the social media network tracking your visits to other websites. The plugin isolates your Facebook profile and creates a form of browser-based container to prevent third-party advertisers and Facebook tracking outside of the network. While not bulletproof, this add-on is worth considering if you want to separate Facebook from the rest of your browsing activities.
Blur: Blur, available for Firefox and Chrome, is an all-around plugin to protect your privacy and security. While the add-on can be used as a password manager and generator, ad blocking, and encryption, the true value is the use of “masked cards” in the premium version of the software. When data breaches occur, financial information is often the target. With this plugin, however, throwaway virtual cards are used with online vendors in replacement for the direct use of your credit card data, keeping it safe should a cyberattack occur.
Privacy Badger: Last but certainly not least, the EFF’s Opera, Firefox, and Chrome-supporting plugin Privacy Badger is focused on preventing ad networks from tracking you. The software monitors third parties that attempt to track users through cookies and digital fingerprinting and will automatically block those which use multiple tracking techniques. The plugin also includes color-coded indicators of domain tracking scripts.

EOH faces R44m fine for delays in home affairs tender

The Department of Home Affairs (DHA) has moved to salvage the controversial multimillion-rand Automated Biometric Identification System (ABIS) tender and slapped technology services company EOH with a R44 million penalty over delays in the implementation of the project.
After months of wrangling and negotiations over the delays, the DHA has fined EOH over the R400 million contract and has recommended it be ceded to a suitable subcontractor.
The department has since approached National Treasury seeking guidance on the matter.
EOH is contesting this penalty and the amount is under dispute.
This is not the first time EOH has been hit with a fine in recent months. In July, the company was penalised R7.5 million by the Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE) for publishing false information in its 2017 and 2018 financial results.
The latest details of the fallout between EOH and the department were revealed in Parliament last week by home affairs minister Dr Aaron Motsoaledi, who presented a rescue plan for the ABIS to the portfolio committee on home affairs.
The contract was for EOH to migrate data on the current Home Affairs National Identification System, which only records photos and fingerprints of South African citizens, to the new ABIS.
The final implementation of the system would provide a single source of identification for citizens across state institutions and private sector entities.
The contract was processed and awarded by the State Information Technology Agency on behalf of the DHA.
However, the project was delayed after the missing of master files in the ABIS contract with EOH and a forensic audit is under way into the contract.
Delivery discrepancies
In his presentation to the portfolio committee, Motsoaledi revealed that out of the R400 million contract, R224 million had already been spent on services, infrastructure and software.
He also said in terms of the contract, if there are any delays in the implementation of the project, the DHA reserved the right to levy a penalty for every month of delay.
“In invoking this penalty clause, DHA levied a penalty of R43 973 141.80 against EOH because the project has already been delayed by two years. EOH is contesting this penalty and hence the amount is under dispute. The contract also stipulates that such disputes are to be mediated by a senior counsel appointed jointly by the DHA and EOH Mthombo,” he said.
The joint appointment has already been made and the mediation process is starting this week.
Furthermore, the minister said EOH has taken a decision to exit all government contracts and as part of its exit plan from the DHA contract, EOH is proposing to cede the work to a subcontractor.
“In the event of EOH exiting, the contract still needs to be salvaged because most plans of modernisation of DHA services revolves around ABIS,” Motsoaledi said.
The minister added that the legal opinion obtained by the DHA suggested that ceding is permissible, subject to certain requirements being met.
According to Motsoaledi, after meeting with officials from the Department of Communications and Digital Technologies, it was decided that the DHA proceed with the ceding, provided the cession is approved by National Treasury.
“The DHA has already approached National Treasury for guidance. It is recommended that the portfolio committee notes the decision to cede the ABIS contract to a suitable subcontractor, subject to the finalisation of the negotiations and approval by National Treasury.”
Discord continues
EOH, however, has denied it is quitting government contracts.
A spokesperson says the company has noted the minister’s presentation, adding: “EOH remains committed to the project insofar as the engagements under way present viable options which are commercially sustainable for both parties.
“EOH maintains and intends to maintain its ongoing strategic relationships and engagements with the government insofar as those relationships and engagements are commercially sustainable.”
Further, in terms of the contract, EOH said it is disputing that it is the cause of the delays.
“In this regard, EOH and the DHA are proactively and constructively engaging one another through their respective attorneys with a view to securing an amicable outcome to the difficulties encountered on the Automated Biometric Identification System project to date. There are presently no arrangements or agreements in place concerning the replacement of EOH on that project, whether by cession or otherwise.”
The JSE-listed company has been battling with a myriad challenges − operational and legal.
EOH’s problems surfaced after Microsoft in February last year terminated its contract with the IT services company after an anonymous whistle-blower filed a complaint with the US Securities and Exchange Commission about alleged malfeasance to do with a R120 million contract with the SA Department of Defence.
Ever since, the company has been trying to improve its image after corporate governance issues emerged following an investigation by ENSafrica, which unearthed suspicious transactions worth about R1.2 billion
www.samigration.com

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