Nov 25, 2021 - Asylum, Asylum Seeker    No Comments

What can I do if my application for refugee status has been rejected and I have been given a ‘must leave’ letter?

What can I do if my application for refugee status has been rejected and I have been given a ‘must leave’ letter?

If your asylum application is rejected, this means that the DHA does not recognise you as a refugee. You will receive a letter stating that you must leave the country or file an appeal usually within 30 days of being told of the rejection. Depending on the reasons for the rejection of your application, you will need to appeal to the Refugee Appeal Board or the Standing Committee for Refugee Affairs. If you think that you do qualify for refugee status it would be a good idea to seek legal advice from an organisation such as ours

How can we help you , please email us to info@samigration.com whatsapp me on:

+27 82 373 8415, where are you now? check our website : www.samigration.com

 

Please rate us by clinking on this links :

Sa Migration International

https://g.page/SAMigration?gm

 

Alternatively, please contact us on :
Sa Migration International

Whatsapp  Tel No : +27 (0) 82 373 8415

 

Tel No office : +27 (0) 82 373 8415 ( Whatsapp )

Tel No admin : +27 (0) 64 126 3073
Tel No sales : +27 (0) 74 0366127
Fax No : 086 579 0155

 

 

www.samigration.com

Cabinet announces Zimbabwe Exemption Permits will not be extended

admin-ajax (1)

Cabinet announces Zimbabwe Exemption Permits will not be extended
25 November 2021 | – Groundup
Holders of the ZEPs given a year to migrate to other permits
The Zimbabwean Exemption Permit is coming to an end.
• The Zimbabwean Exemption Permit which expires on 31 December will not be renewed Cabinet announced on Thursday.
• About 182,000 Zimbabweans who hold the permit have been given a year’s grace to migrate to other permits to allow them to stay in South Africa.
• The Cabinet decision is disappointing for many who now face an uncertain future.
On Thursday, Cabinet announced that the Zimbabwean Exemption Permit (ZEP), which ends 31 December, will not be extended.
However, Cabinet decided on a 12-month grace period during which time ZEP holders “should apply for other permits appropriate to their particular status or situation”. Those who are not successful will have to leave South Africa or face deportation, said Cabinet.
This ends months of rising anxiety for about 180,000 Zimbabweans in South Africa as the ZEP expiry date loomed and there had been no indication of what government intended to do.
Permit holders were debating whether to return home for Christmas. Many said banks had been refusing to grant them loans and cancelling their pre-approved bond applications, while employers were not renewing contracts because of their uncertain status. Cabinet’s grace period will not necessarly help in this regard, and many ZEP holders are unlikely to qualify for other permits.
Leaving the announcement to the eleventh-hour had also allowed for misinformation that the South African government had extended the permits by five years to circulate on social media, rumours which the Cabinet statement referred to as fake news.
Back in October 2019, Minister of Home Affairs Aaron Motsoaledi told GroundUp that the three special permits which were issued to legalise the status of nationals from Lesotho, Zimbabwe and Angola already living in South Africa, would be renewed. At the time the minister said they can’t stop renewing special permits if the problems that led to those special permits are not yet resolved. But he also said that permits can’t automatically be renewed by the department; it needed Cabinet.
Cabinet has now spoken.
“I’m very disappointed with the decision by the Cabinet,” said Advocate Simba Chitando, who filed papers in the Gauteng High Court in October requesting the South African government to grant ZEP holders permanent residency.
“I knew that the cancellation of the permit was being called for by many political parties, many of whom did well in the elections. The unfortunate decision has left litigation as the only viable solution for ZEP holders, permanently resident in the country, and who have given over a decade of their lives to this country,” Chitando told GroundUp shortly after the Cabinet announcement.
The ZEP community was divided on Chitando’s legal challenge, who feared it would ruin the chance of getting the permit extended. That has now been put to bed.
Chitando said the ZEP exploited Zimbabwean labour and made them second class citizens in a constitutional democracy, “renewable after every four years, operating like a dompas from the apartheid era, in a manner that Zimbabwean migrants to Europe, the US, and Australia, have not experienced”.
“It is a slave permit, and an abomination to the Pan African principle of ubuntu,” he said.
He is proceeding with his litigation.
Union of Zimbabwean Educators Western (UZEWC) said as much as they are happy for the 12 month reprieve they still maintain that granting permanent residency to deserving Zimbabweans should have been considered.
“Zimbabweans have been on special work permits for more than ten years, hence their stay in South Africa has been legal. They have been paying taxes. Some have started families here, and have children,” said Jack Mutsvairo, chairperson of the union.
“We also expect the DHA to expeditiously inform employers, creditors and the banking sector … so that none of our members are prejudiced.”
“We also hope that the application for other suitable permits by Zimbabweans will not be subjected to avoidable bureaucratic shenanigans. Let this be a user-friendly application process with predetermined timeframes.”
There are also other special exemption permits that will need decisions:
On 16 August 2021, Home Affairs opened the application for an Angolan Exemption Permit. The Angolan Special Permit (ASP) was first issued in 2018 and expires at the end of this year.
The Lesotho Exemption Permit (LEP) of 2019 expires on 31 December 2023.

www.samigration.com

Nov 22, 2021 - General    No Comments

Supply chain attacks are the hacker’s new favourite weapon. And the threat is getting bigger

Supply chain attacks are the hacker’s new favourite weapon. And the threat is getting bigger

20 November 2021- ZD Met

Major incidents have demonstrated how powerful supply chain attacks can be – is your network resilient enough to cope?

Compromising a business supply chain is a key goal for cyber attackers, because by gaining access to a company that provides software or services to many other companies, it’s possible to find a potential way into thousands of targets at once.

Several major incidents during the past 12 months have demonstrated the large-scale consequences supply chain attacks can have. In one of the biggest cybersecurity incidents in recent years, cyber attackers working for the Russian foreign intelligence service compromised updates from IT services provider SolarWinds that were downloaded by 18,000 customers, with the attackers then going on to target around 100 of those customers including several US government agencies.

Other cyber criminals were able to carry out a supply chain attack using a vulnerability in software from Kaseya to launch a ransomware attack that affected thousands of its customers around the world.

“The issue of the threat to IT service providers as part of a supply chain was clearly one of the features of the last year,” said Simon Mehdian-Staffell, UK government affairs manager at Microsoft, speaking during a Chatham House Cyber 2021 Conference discussion on the rise of state-backed cyberattacks.

Some of these attacks have been identified because they’ve been on such a large scale, like the ones above. But there are means of supply chain compromise that are far less likely to draw attention, but can be very effective. And a more tightly focused campaign might be harder to detect.

“Clearly there’s trade-offs to be made between where they cast their net and the potential increased likelihood of being detected, so operators are having to make those trade-offs,” said Jamie Collier, cyber threat intelligence consultant at Mandiant, also speaking during the Chatham House panel.

While big attacks get the attention, the past few years have seen “other vectors of supply chain compromise that are dominating the numbers that maybe don’t get the attention they deserve”, he added.

These lower-scale, less obvious supply chain attacks can be just as effective for cyber attackers, providing discreet pathways into networks. In particular, developer or mobile environments can provide this gateway – and cyber attackers have noticed.

“First of all would be developer environments, we see a huge amount of supply chain compromise around there. And the second would be mobile.” said Collier.

“So, while we want to focus on the likes of SolarWinds, there is a wider landscape out there and it’s important we recognise that broader spectrum,” he added.

Given the success of major supply chain attacks thus far, they’ll remain a cybersecurity threat for the foreseeable future.

“Supply chain attacks continue to be an attractive vector at the hand of sophisticated actors and the threat from these attacks is likely to grow. Especially as we anticipate technology supply chains will become increasingly complicated in the coming years,” Lindy Cameron, CEO of the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC), said in a keynote address to the Cyber 2021 Conference.

The threat of supply chain attacks means that organisations should examine what they can do to make themselves more resilient to cyberattacks. They should also examine how to protect themselves in the event of one of their suppliers unknowingly falling victim to a malicious cyber campaign.

“First, organisations need to establish a clear security direction with their suppliers, asking for and incentivising good security through the supply chain. This is often relatively straightforward security practices, such as controlling how privileged access is managed,” said Cameron.

“Second, organisations should take an approach where their design is resilient if a technology supplier is compromised. The SolarWinds incident is a good example. To be blunt, if your SolarWinds installation couldn’t talk directly to the internet – which it shouldn’t have been able to do – then the whole attack was irrelevant to your network,” she added.

Organisations and their information security teams can go a long way to helping to protect the network from attacks by knowing exactly what’s on it and what is connected to the internet. By ensuring infrastructure that doesn’t need to be connected directly to the internet isn’t directly connected, you can provide a major barrier to attacks being successful.

www,vsoftsystems.co.za

Nov 22, 2021 - General    No Comments

Supply chain attacks are the hacker’s new favourite weapon. And the threat is getting bigger

Time and Problem Picture6

20 November 2021- ZD Met

Major incidents have demonstrated how powerful supply chain attacks can be – is your network resilient enough to cope?

Compromising a business supply chain is a key goal for cyber attackers, because by gaining access to a company that provides software or services to many other companies, it’s possible to find a potential way into thousands of targets at once.

Several major incidents during the past 12 months have demonstrated the large-scale consequences supply chain attacks can have. In one of the biggest cybersecurity incidents in recent years, cyber attackers working for the Russian foreign intelligence service compromised updates from IT services provider SolarWinds that were downloaded by 18,000 customers, with the attackers then going on to target around 100 of those customers including several US government agencies.

Other cyber criminals were able to carry out a supply chain attack using a vulnerability in software from Kaseya to launch a ransomware attack that affected thousands of its customers around the world.

“The issue of the threat to IT service providers as part of a supply chain was clearly one of the features of the last year,” said Simon Mehdian-Staffell, UK government affairs manager at Microsoft, speaking during a Chatham House Cyber 2021 Conference discussion on the rise of state-backed cyberattacks.

Some of these attacks have been identified because they’ve been on such a large scale, like the ones above. But there are means of supply chain compromise that are far less likely to draw attention, but can be very effective. And a more tightly focused campaign might be harder to detect.

“Clearly there’s trade-offs to be made between where they cast their net and the potential increased likelihood of being detected, so operators are having to make those trade-offs,” said Jamie Collier, cyber threat intelligence consultant at Mandiant, also speaking during the Chatham House panel.

While big attacks get the attention, the past few years have seen “other vectors of supply chain compromise that are dominating the numbers that maybe don’t get the attention they deserve”, he added.

These lower-scale, less obvious supply chain attacks can be just as effective for cyber attackers, providing discreet pathways into networks. In particular, developer or mobile environments can provide this gateway – and cyber attackers have noticed.

“First of all would be developer environments, we see a huge amount of supply chain compromise around there. And the second would be mobile.” said Collier.

“So, while we want to focus on the likes of SolarWinds, there is a wider landscape out there and it’s important we recognise that broader spectrum,” he added.

Given the success of major supply chain attacks thus far, they’ll remain a cybersecurity threat for the foreseeable future.

“Supply chain attacks continue to be an attractive vector at the hand of sophisticated actors and the threat from these attacks is likely to grow. Especially as we anticipate technology supply chains will become increasingly complicated in the coming years,” Lindy Cameron, CEO of the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC), said in a keynote address to the Cyber 2021 Conference.

The threat of supply chain attacks means that organisations should examine what they can do to make themselves more resilient to cyberattacks. They should also examine how to protect themselves in the event of one of their suppliers unknowingly falling victim to a malicious cyber campaign.

“First, organisations need to establish a clear security direction with their suppliers, asking for and incentivising good security through the supply chain. This is often relatively straightforward security practices, such as controlling how privileged access is managed,” said Cameron.

“Second, organisations should take an approach where their design is resilient if a technology supplier is compromised. The SolarWinds incident is a good example. To be blunt, if your SolarWinds installation couldn’t talk directly to the internet – which it shouldn’t have been able to do – then the whole attack was irrelevant to your network,” she added.

Organisations and their information security teams can go a long way to helping to protect the network from attacks by knowing exactly what’s on it and what is connected to the internet. By ensuring infrastructure that doesn’t need to be connected directly to the internet isn’t directly connected, you can provide a major barrier to attacks being successful.

www,vsoftsystems.co.za

These are the most in-demand jobs in SA’s tech sector – here’s what you’ll need to bag them

These are the most in-demand jobs in SA’s tech sector – here’s what you’ll need to bag them

Business Insider SA – 18 Nov  2021

  • The Covid-19 pandemic has had a negative impact on most businesses, but those in the tech sector are booming.
  • Information and Communications Technology (ICT), financial services, and FinTech companies are scaling up operations while other businesses transition to digital.
  • This has created a surge in demand for IT workers.
  • Some of the positions in most-demand are in cloud computing, artificial intelligence, machine learning, data analysis, and cybersecurity.

South Africa’s technology sector is booming as more businesses move to digital in a trend which has been hastened by the Covid-19 pandemic. This promises high-paying job opportunities, but only for those with the right skills and experience.

While few industries have been left unscathed by the pandemic, tech companies, from e-commerce companies to cybersecurity firms, have rocketed. The Covid-19 pandemic, with its lockdowns and work-from-home instructions, has catapulted digital systems to the fore and forced brick and mortar businesses to revaluate.

These businesses have rushed to set-up digital systems, whether for online sales or to accommodate remote work, while others already in the tech space scale their operations. This has created great demand for IT workers, especially among Information and Communications Technology (ICT), financial services, and FinTech companies, according to leading recruitment company, Michael Page.

“MNCs [multinational corporations] in ICT and FinTech, and some companies like TakeALot.com and Jumia in the retail sector look at technology as an enabler of their business, and it is such companies that will remain desirable employers to top IT talent,” says Robyn Stainbank, a senior consultant for technology for Michael Page in Africa.

A career in the technology sector, as well as being in demand, is lucrative, according to Michael Page’s latest Market Overview and Hiring Insights Guide for 2022.

According to the report published earlier in November, yearly average salaries range from R350,000 (around R29,000 a month) for a network engineer in a small- and medium-sized enterprise (SME) up to R3 million (R250,000 a month) for a Chief Information Officer (CIO) of an MNC.

Cloud computing, which allows the remote delivery and hosting of data storage, servers, databases, networking, and software, is in especially high demand, according to Michael Page.

Employees best equipped to capitalise on this demand and find a job in cloud computing field should have skills and experience in Amazon Web Services (AWS), Azure, DevOps, Docker, and Kubernetes.

“DevOps is a hybrid role that combines software development, operations, and quality assurance. Similar IT roles that can combine IT with other crucial skills for the business are in demand,” says Stainbank.

Positions in artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning, software development, data science, and cybersecurity are also in high demand.

“Companies are moving beyond just reporting on data and management information to also using data for insights, which is essentially the commercialisation of that data,” notes Michael Page’s latest Market Overview and Hiring Insights Guide.

“Companies are developing their capabilities to make more data-driven decisions, and hence the demand for talent with data-related expertise.”

Cybersecurity, ensuring that internet-connected systems are safe and secure, is also near the top of the agenda for companies that have needed to cater to remote work. And while employees begin trickling back into offices, hybrid work models are likely to become part of the new normal, coinciding with cyber criminals upping the ante.

“With more and more people working from home, cloud networks are becoming security targets. Cybersecurity is an issue of critical importance and companies are prioritising hiring talent with the expertise of putting safeguarding measures in place,” explains Michael Page.

Stainbank adds that to fully meet the current and future demand in this sector, Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) education needs to be prioritised in South Africa.

“Increased effort needs to be undertaken to modernise and develop sustainable education programmes with an emphasis on innovation, science, and technology,” says Stainbank.

www.vsoftsystems.co.za22406357_1467467326639963_2040093645482126645_n

No decision has been made on the Zimbabwe Exemption Permit

No decision has been made on the Zimbabwe Exemption Permit

19 November 2021 – DHA

The Department of Home Affairs has noted a misleading online news article, purportedly emanating from Zimbabwe, which has subsequently been followed by social media posts claiming that Zimbabwe Exemption Permits have been extended for a period of five years.

This is patently untrue. Paddling this untruth is obviously aimed at pressuring the South African Government into making a particular decision in relation to these permits.

Secondly, in South Africa, there is nothing called a Home Affairs Ministerial Committee on Zimbabwe Permits. Such a committee has never existed at Home Affairs.

The matter of the Zimbabwe Exemption Permit is still to be considered by Cabinet. The next regular Cabinet sitting is scheduled for next week.

Communication on this will be made through the regular post Cabinet communications protocols.

 

ISSUED BY DEPARTMENT OF HOME AFFAIRS22491453_1473243116062384_5425743881612651696_n

South African Permanent Residence

South African Permanent Residence

South Africa encourages permanent residency if you are serious about staying in South Africa on a long terms permanent basis there are many categories you can apply under.

  1. Hold a General Work Visa for five years and have a permanent job offer.
  2. Hold a Relative’s Visa sponsored by an immediate family member.
  3. Hold a Critical Skills Visa and have 5 years relevant work experience.
  4. Be in a proven life partner relationship for five years
  5. Be married to an SA Spouse for at least five years.
  6. Have held Refugee Asylum Status for five years.
  7. Hold a Business Visa.
  8. Receive a monthly income of R37,000 through Pension or Retirement Annuity
  9. Have a net asset worth of R12m and payment to Home Affairs of R120,000

Click Here if you require more information on this visa type and we will revert to you

Pages:«1234567...422»