Applying for Critical Skills Work Visa for South Africa

Applying for Critical Skills Work Visa for South Africa

Applying for Critical Skills Work Visa for South Africa

The critical skills work visa offers those applicants who practice within designated professions and who have 5 years appropriate post qualification experience, the opportunity to apply immediately for permanent residency.

If you are seeking to make an application under the critical skills category but do not possess 5 years post qualification experience please see here for more details on the critical skills work visa.

Below we discuss how to go about applying for a critical skills work visa.

Before submitting your application

Assessing whether you qualify for a critical skills work visa is the first step. The critical skills work visa has a number of criteria that includes:

  • Your qualification.
  • Your occupation.
  • Your years of experience.
  • Your registration with the appropriate professional bodies.

You can view the critical skills list on our website www.samigration.com

Preparing your application for a critical skills work visa

  • You will need to complete the permanent residency application form and pay the applicable application fee.
  • Submit a copy of your unabridged birth certificate.
  • Undertake biometrics.
  • Submit a yellow fever vaccination certificate where applicable.
  • Provide police clearance certificates for all countries you have stayed in for in excess of 12 months since 18.
  • Submit medical and radiological reports.
  • Submit a marriage certificate where appropriate.
  • Include unabridged birth certificates in respect of each dependent child.
  • Proof that the applicant falls within the critical skills category.
  • A certificate of registration with the professional body.
  • Proof of post-qualification experience of at least five years.
  • Testimonials from previous employers and a comprehensive curriculum vitae.
  • A letter of motivation indicating that the critical skills possessed by the applicant will
    be to the benefit of the South African environment in which the person intends to
    operate and which relates to the critical skill in question.

Submitting your application for a critical skills visa

It is important to note that when applying for a critical skills work visa this can only be done in South Africa if you are on an appropriate visa. As an example, if you are an existing critical skills work visa holder you may apply for permanent residence in South Africa. It is always best to seek professional guidance on this matter as permanent residence applications take some time (up to 24 months) and where you submit your application can have far reaching consequences.

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SA Visa / Visitors Visa

Visitors Visa

The maximum duration for this Visa is 3 months. If a longer stay is required the applicant must apply in advance abroad or he can extend the visitor’s Visa locally, confirming the purpose of stay.

A valid return air / bus ticket, proof of sufficient financial means, the application fee andmust be accompany an application for extension. Pease note that a visitor’s Visa can only be extended once for a maximum of 3 months.

Please be aware that all extensions and changes need to be applied for 30 days before expiry of the current Visa. Missing the cut-off date without demonstration of good cause (e.g. illness, accident) will mean that you have to leave South Africa.

Countries exempt from South African visas:

The exemptions pertain to ordinary, diplomatic and official passport holders. Official visits (on invitation of the South African Government) and accreditation for holders of diplomatic and official passport holders are not dealt with here.

Visas are not required by citizens of the following countries for the periods and subject to the conditions indicated:

Holders of South African passports, travel documents and documents for travel purposes.

Holders of passports of The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland including the British Islands Bailiwick of Guernsey and Jersey, Isle of Mann and Virgin Islands as well as the Republic of Ireland are totally exempt from South African visa control and thus do not require visas for any purpose regulated by visas.

 

Please Note:

Angola: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Antigua and Barbuda: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Argentina: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 90 days and transits
Australia: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits
Austria: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits

Barbados: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Belgium: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits
Belize: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Benin: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Bolivia: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Botswana: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Brazil: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 90 days and transits

Canada: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits
Cape Verde: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Chile: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 90 days and transits
Costa Rica: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Cyprus: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits. Diplomatic and official passport holders visiting the RSA for holiday purposes are exempt for 90 days.
Czech Republic: Holders of diplomatic and official passports for holiday visits not exceeding 90 days and transits

Denmark: Bona fide holiday and business visits only (period unspecified) and transits

Ecuador: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 90 days and transits
Egypt: Holders of diplomatic and official passports for holiday visits not exceeding 30 days and transits

Finland: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits
France: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits

Gabon: Bona fide holiday & business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Germany: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits
Greece: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits
Guyana: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits

Hong Kong: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits This exemption is only with regard to holders of Hong Kong British National – Overseas (BNO) passports, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) passports and Hong Kong Certificates of Identity.
Hungary: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits Diplomatic and official passport holders visiting the RSA for holiday purposes are exempt for 120 days.

Iceland: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits
Israel: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 90 days and transits
Italy: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits

Jamaica: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 90 days and transits
Japan: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits
Jordan: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits

Lesotho: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Liechtenstein: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits
Luxemburg: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits

Macau: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits This exemption is only with regard to holders of Macau Special Administrative Region passports (MSAR).
Malaysia: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Maldives: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Malta: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 90 days and transits Malta: Holders of diplomatic and official passports for holiday visits not exceeding 90 days and transits
Mauritius: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Mexico: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Morocco: Holders of diplomatic and official passports for holiday visits not exceeding 30 days and transits

Namibia: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Netherlands (Kingdom of the): Bona fide holiday and business visits only (period unspecified) and transits
New Zealand: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits
Norway: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits

Paraguay: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 90 days and transits
Peru: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Poland: Holders of diplomatic and official passports for holiday visits not exceeding 90 days and transits
Portugal: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits

Romania: Holders of diplomatic and official passports for holiday visits not exceeding 120 days and transits

San Marino: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 90 days and transits
Seychelles: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Singapore: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Slovak Republic: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
South Korea: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Spain: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits
St Helena: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 90 days and transits
St Vincent & the Grenadines: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 90 days and transits
Swaziland: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 90 days and transits
Sweden: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits
Switzerland: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits

Thailand: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Tunisia: Holders of diplomatic and official passports for holiday visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Turkey: Bona fide holiday & business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits

United States of America: Bona fide holiday and business visits only (period unspecified) and transits
Uruguay: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 90 days and transits

Venezuala: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 90 days and transits

Zambia: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Zimbabwe: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits. Only government officials, including police on cross border investigation

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Nov 6, 2021 - Citizenship, General, Travel    No Comments

How can a mother with an expired visa register her children?

studyvisa

Groundup – 06 November 2021

The following question is from a reader who needs information about registration papers for children born in South Africa to a Zimbabwean mom whose visa has expired

How can a mother with an expired visa register her children?

The short answer

There are a few possible options, but the best route may be to get legal help.

The whole question

My girlfriend is from Zimbabwe. Her visa has expired but her passport is still valid. She and her children (aged three and five) have been with me at my home for the last two years. Both children were born in South Africa but, for whatever reason, they were never issued with any registration papers – only the hospital card. We urgently need birth certificates or ID numbers for the children as the five-year-old needs to enrol in school. Currently they are both attending a registered creche that does not require any documents.

I have been in South Africa since 1984 and am a permanent resident with an ID number. I am prepared, with pleasure, to have the children under my name as we are living as a loving family. My girlfriend is worried about making noise at Home Affairs because of her visa status, even though we know that the Constitution guarantees an identification to every child born here regardless of the parents’ race, nationality or status.

Despite numerous attempts with Home Affairs, we have been unsuccessful. After queuing for four hours every time, we get mixed messages about what we need to do. The bribing option has been offered to us but we are law-abiding people and want to do this legally.

The long answer

Firstly, as the children were not registered within thirty days of birth, as is required by law, you would need to apply for late registration of birth. If it is after 1 year but before 15 years, you would need to give Home Affairs the following documents:

  • A completed Form B1-24/1, together with written reasons why the birth wasn’t notified, and as many as possible of the following documents to confirm the child’s identity as are relevant, given their age:
  1. A certificate from the hospital or maternity home where the child was born. The certificate must be signed by the person in charge, and contain the institution’s official stamp;
  2. Official confirmation of the child’s personal details, extracted from the school register of the first school attended by the child. The confirmation must be on the school’s official letterhead, be signed by the principal, and contain the school’s official stamp. (This could refer also to the creche they presently attend.);
  3. The child’s baptismal certificate – if relevant;
  4. Sworn affidavits by the parents;
  5. A clinic card.

There was a great constitutional victory for unmarried fathers on 22 September 2021, when the Constitutional Court declared Section 10 of the Births and Death Registration Act (BDRA) unconstitutional and ordered it to be deleted entirely from the BDRA. It was found to be unconstitutional because it did not allow unmarried fathers to register their children’s births in their name when the mother could not do so or was unwilling to do so, or when the mother could not be present. The judgment specifically mentioned the problem of undocumented mothers “…who live and give birth to children in South Africa and are unable to register the births of these children. Third, another difficulty arises as a result of the requirement that parents, who are non-South African citizens, must produce a certified copy of a valid passport or visa.”

All of the above left children without birth certificates.

The Centre for Child Law, which took the case to the Constitutional Court and was represented by Lawyers for Human Rights, said that children are vulnerable members of society who were even more vulnerable when they don’t have valid birth certificates because, not only could they be excluded from education, social assistance and health care but, crucially, could be excluded from access to their nationality and become stateless.

As you rightly said in your email, the Constitution guarantees the right of every child born here to an identity, and the 2021 court judgment means that this right must now be realised. The Constitutional Court found that it was not justified to distinguish between children born to married parents and children born to unmarried parents when it came to deciding what surname could be given to a child. Section 10 penalised children born to unmarried parents and was thus unconstitutional. Unmarried fathers will now be able to register their children under their surname, in the absence of the mother or without her consent.

But although this was a crucial victory for children and unmarried fathers, it will not solve your problem with Home Affairs as you are not the children’s biological father.

Given that the visa of your Zimbabwean girlfriend and mother of the children has expired, she obviously does not wish to expose herself to possible deportation by going to Home Affairs to do the late registration of birth for the children. It would seem that your choices are either to sort out her visa with Home Affairs, which may well be a difficult and lengthy process involving your girlfriend returning to Zimbabwe and re-applying for a visa from there, or to legalise your own relationship with the children. This could be by adopting them.

Adoption of South African children is done in terms of the Children’s Act, 2005 (Act 38 of 2005) and is administered by the Department of Social Development, while the notice of adoption must be recorded by Home Affairs in the birth registration of the children.

Under the Children’s Act, written consent to the adoption must be given by the parent or parents or legal guardian of the children. This consent (Form 61) must be signed in the presence of the presiding officer of the Children’s Court who will then attest to the signature. This written consent can be withdrawn by the person giving it within 60 days if they change their mind.

Alternately, if you were to marry your girlfriend to legalise your relationship with the children, the following documents would be required by Home Affairs to marry you, according to their website:

“On the day of the marriage a couple must present the following documents to the person officiating at the wedding:

  • Identity documents (for each person getting married);
  • If a foreign national is marrying a South African citizen, they should both present their valid passports as well as a completed BI-31 Form (Declaration for the Purpose of Marriage, Letter of no impediment);
  • If any of the persons getting married are divorced, then the final decree of divorce should be furnished;
  • If any of the persons getting married are widowed, the deceased spouse’s death certificate must be submitted.

www.samigration.com

Nov 6, 2021 - Asylum, Asylum Seeker, Travel, Visa    No Comments

180 000 Zimbabweans Face Deportation SA Halts Visa Renewals

180 000 Zimbabweans Face Deportation SA Halts Visa Renewals

 

Zimeye – 2 November 2021

By A Correspondent-The South African Cabinet will soon announce a decision on the renewal of the Zimbabwe Exemption Permits (ZEP) for nearly 180 000 Zimbabweans based in the neighbouring country.
Zimbabweans have benefitted from special permits since 2010 when the Dispensation of Zimbabweans Project (DZP) was introduced.
DZP was aimed at regularising Zimbabweans residing in the neighbouring country to reduce pressure on the asylum management system.
The permits expired in 2014 before South Africa introduced the Zimbabwe Special Permit (ZSP) which lapsed at the end of 2017.

It was followed by the ZEP, which will expire on December 31.
Zimbabwe’s Ambassador to South Africa David Hamadziripi said Government has been engaged in high-level meetings with South Africa over the permit issue.
“The matter of the ZEP is part of the agenda of the discussions held between Zimbabwe and South Africa in the context of the Bi-National Commission (BNC). Concerning the extension of the permits, the Embassy has had discussions with the relevant authorities in South Africa since the first quarter of the year,” said Ambassador Hamadziripi.
“In May 2021, there was further discussion of the issue when the two countries’ Ministers of Foreign Affairs met in Cape Town. In all these interactions, the government of South Africa informed us that the decision on the renewal of the permits would be taken by their Cabinet and that processes towards that end were in motion.”
Zimbabwe Community in South Africa chairperson Mr Ngqabutho Mabhena said most Zimbabweans were anxious as the year is coming to an end.

“We are waiting for the South African government to make an announcement. We were informed that a decision will be made in November so we are waiting. We do not know what is going to happen, but, of course, people are worried about what is likely to be announced by the Minister of Home Affairs when he decides to make an announcement,” said Mr Mabhena.
He said financial institutions and some employers have started demanding that permit holders renew their permits.
“We have been engaging with both the Zimbabwean and South African governments and made submissions that holders of the ZEP should be granted permanent residence status because they have been resident here for more than 10 years and continue to contribute to the South African economy,” said Mr Mabhena.
“The second option is that if they are not granted permanent residence, they should be granted a long-term visa which is about 10 years or a normal renewal be an option.

www.samigration.comasylum depaortation Picture10

Nov 3, 2021 - Asylum, Asylum Seeker, Travel, Visa    No Comments

Criminal Record – Visa Stuck – Paid an AOG ( Admission of Guilt ) fine – We can remove it .

Court

Frequently Asked Questions

There is no doubt that the expungement laws in South Africa can be confusing and convoluted. Our goal at CRR is to provide a one stop resource for South African expungement information. As you browse through the site you will find a wealth of knowledge about what exactly expungement is, what the process of expungement entails, and whether your particular situation is eligible for expungement. Here is a list of the most common frequently asked questions about removing a criminal record:

  • Do I qualify to remove my criminal record?
  • Is it legal to remove my criminal record?
  • What is expungement?
  • Why is an expungement firm essential?
  • Why is expungement important?
  • Who is eligible for the standard 10 year expungement?
  • What if I have multiple convictions?
  • What can I expect from CRR?
  • What are the benefits of getting my criminal record expunged?
  • How many applications are successful?
  • What if I have already applied?
  • How long does it take?
  • Is there a way to speed up the expungement process?
  • I don’t qualify for the standard 10 year expungement, what other options do I have?
  • How can we help you , please email us to info@samigration.com whatsapp me on:
  • +27 82 373 8415, where are you now? check our website : samigration.com
  • Alternatively , please contact us on :
    Sa Migration International
  • Whatsapp  Tel No : +27 (0) 82 373 8415

 

  • Tel No office : +27 (0) 82 373 8415 ( Whatsapp )
  • Tel No admin : +27 (0) 64 126 3073
    Tel No sales : +27 (0) 74 0366127
    Fax No : 086 579 0155

 

Nov 1, 2021 - Travel, Visa, Visitors Permit    No Comments

SA Visa – Visitors Visa

Visitors Visa

The maximum duration for this Visa is 3 months. If a longer stay is required the applicant must apply in advance abroad or he can extend the visitor’s Visa locally, confirming the purpose of stay.

A valid return air / bus ticket, proof of sufficient financial means, the application fee andmust be accompany an application for extension. Pease note that a visitor’s Visa can only be extended once for a maximum of 3 months.

Please be aware that all extensions and changes need to be applied for 30 days before expiry of the current Visa. Missing the cut-off date without demonstration of good cause (e.g. illness, accident) will mean that you have to leave South Africa.

Countries exempt from South African visas:

The exemptions pertain to ordinary, diplomatic and official passport holders. Official visits (on invitation of the South African Government) and accreditation for holders of diplomatic and official passport holders are not dealt with here.

Visas are not required by citizens of the following countries for the periods and subject to the conditions indicated:

Holders of South African passports, travel documents and documents for travel purposes.

Holders of passports of The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland including the British Islands Bailiwick of Guernsey and Jersey, Isle of Mann and Virgin Islands as well as the Republic of Ireland are totally exempt from South African visa control and thus do not require visas for any purpose regulated by visas.

Please Note:

Angola: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Antigua and Barbuda: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Argentina: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 90 days and transits
Australia: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits
Austria: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits

Barbados: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Belgium: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits
Belize: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Benin: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Bolivia: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Botswana: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Brazil: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 90 days and transits

Canada: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits
Cape Verde: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Chile: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 90 days and transits
Costa Rica: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Cyprus: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits. Diplomatic and official passport holders visiting the RSA for holiday purposes are exempt for 90 days.
Czech Republic: Holders of diplomatic and official passports for holiday visits not exceeding 90 days and transits

Denmark: Bona fide holiday and business visits only (period unspecified) and transits

Ecuador: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 90 days and transits
Egypt: Holders of diplomatic and official passports for holiday visits not exceeding 30 days and transits

Finland: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits
France: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits

Gabon: Bona fide holiday & business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Germany: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits
Greece: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits
Guyana: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits

Hong Kong: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits This exemption is only with regard to holders of Hong Kong British National – Overseas (BNO) passports, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) passports and Hong Kong Certificates of Identity.
Hungary: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits Diplomatic and official passport holders visiting the RSA for holiday purposes are exempt for 120 days.

Iceland: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits
Israel: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 90 days and transits
Italy: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits

Jamaica: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 90 days and transits
Japan: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits
Jordan: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits

Lesotho: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Liechtenstein: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits
Luxemburg: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits

Macau: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits This exemption is only with regard to holders of Macau Special Administrative Region passports (MSAR).
Malaysia: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Maldives: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Malta: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 90 days and transits Malta: Holders of diplomatic and official passports for holiday visits not exceeding 90 days and transits
Mauritius: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Mexico: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Morocco: Holders of diplomatic and official passports for holiday visits not exceeding 30 days and transits

Namibia: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Netherlands (Kingdom of the): Bona fide holiday and business visits only (period unspecified) and transits
New Zealand: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits
Norway: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits

Paraguay: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 90 days and transits
Peru: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Poland: Holders of diplomatic and official passports for holiday visits not exceeding 90 days and transits
Portugal: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits

Romania: Holders of diplomatic and official passports for holiday visits not exceeding 120 days and transits

San Marino: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 90 days and transits
Seychelles: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Singapore: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Slovak Republic: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
South Korea: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Spain: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits
St Helena: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 90 days and transits
St Vincent & the Grenadines: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 90 days and transits
Swaziland: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 90 days and transits
Sweden: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits
Switzerland: Bona fide holiday & business visits only (period unspecified) and transits

Thailand: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Tunisia: Holders of diplomatic and official passports for holiday visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Turkey: Bona fide holiday & business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits

United States of America: Bona fide holiday and business visits only (period unspecified) and transits
Uruguay: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 90 days and transits

Venezuala: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 90 days and transits

Zambia: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits
Zimbabwe: Bona fide holiday and business visits not exceeding 30 days and transits. Only government officials, including police on cross border investigation

www.samigration.coSA1

South African Volunteer Visa

South African Volunteer Visa

 

Most volunteer programs are for 3 months to 3 years. This allows volunteers to come into South Africa on a normal tourist visa and work in the country. However, some volunteers will come into the country on programs that last for more than 3 months. This is where SA Migration can assist.

There are many volunteer opportunities in South Africa. The country welcomes volunteers and if you plan to volunteer through a proper volunteer organization and have been accepted, you can apply for a Volunteer Visa. In some cases, if you plan to volunteer for three months or less, you may not need a visa. Please check with us.

The Volunteer Visa is a temporary residency visa. It is a multiple entry visa and is renewable. This is the correct visa to choose if you have an acceptance letter from a Registered Volunteer Organization, are not being paid for your work, and plan to volunteer for your entire stay in South Africa.

www.samigration.comstudyVis